Why I Will No Longer Blog About Star Trek

Longevity. This is what online content creators look for when they work to update their platform. Many bloggers, myself included, want to put out content that will hook you, the reader, and keep you coming back for more. Longevity is also one of the many legacies the Star Trek franchise has managed to maintain since the first episode ever aired in 1969. I mention longevity because my posts on Star Trek have been some of my most popular, statistically, ever.

Longevity. I’ve been a fan of Star Trek for a very long time. For as long as I can remember, Wednesday nights (and sometimes Friday nights) were always, always reserved for Star Trek until the early 2000s. Growing up, I’d geek out when I recognized actors, or their voice acting, in other shows. Several years ago I met Jonathan Frakes and LeVar Burton (I cried. It was embarrassing). And, even more recently, I used to religiously listen to The Delta Flyers’ podcast with Voyager actors Garrett Wang and Robert Duncan McNeil.

When I was in college I wrote an entire speech about why Trek is still relevant in today’s world. To this day I wish I’d kept a copy of it but, alas, it is nowhere to be found. My family and I used to hurry home from Wednesday night events at church (band practice + youth group) just so we could have our Star Trek tradition. There was no such thing as a DVR when I was a kid.

Pair all of the above with a budding writer’s love for writing, and you’ve got a teenager who’d sit at her family’s computer writing Star Trek fan fiction before she even knew that was a thing (here’s my first ever, poorly written blog post on the matter). Fast forward to 2021. I am now 35 going on 36 and, I really hate saying this, but Star Trek has, within recent years, lost its magic with me. Not only that, but I can precisely pinpoint when it happened. Maybe not to the date, but definitely the reason to make me rethink my love for the franchise.

Reason One. When the first rumbles of Star Trek: Picard began, oh I was so excited to once again indulge in some Prime Time television! Yay! Perhaps it would be a little revival of my childhood. Having Trek back on the air, in a traditional sense, would’ve totally rekindled my interest in a network – any network, really – again. Sadly, that’s not the route CBS intended to go.

Star Trek: Picard premiered on what was once known as CBS All Access (now Paramount+), and you had to pay extra money just to watch it. To this day I am still salty its producers didn’t even give it a chance, initially, on the network itself. I think they finally showed the first episode “on air” after Picard’s original run. But at the time I didn’t have internet. And I know there are many older Trek fans who don’t have reliable access to the internet either.

Now before you judge me too harshly for that first reason, I do have a few more reasons for becoming disenchanted with said franchise. Reason Two: some controversial opinions from the actors themselves.

I get it – we’re all humans. We want to meet our favorite actors. We want to indulge an escape from the real world for a little bit. But sometimes “meeting” your, for lack of a better term, “idol” online in a way can really pull away that veil. Especially if they’re actually nothing like the character they portrayed in your favorite show.

Finally, it’s time for Reason Three: Star Trek was once akin to my own identity. It no longer defines who I am. How many hours of my teen years did I spend obsessing over characters or shows? How many times can one person watch every season before it becomes stale? How many times can one dream over the impossible “what if’s” of meeting an entire crew of actors at once? All those things combined made me rethink who I really was. Rather, who I really am.

Somewhere along the line, I lost interest in other things. I lost myself to fandom during the process of growing up. We humans have an innate tendency to latch onto whatever makes us happy. The thing is, Star Trek isn’t eternal. Kpop (another past interest) isn’t eternal. We are not eternal.

What are, what should be, my actual priorities? Faith. Family. Writing. Health. I found myself missing out on these aspects of life; I never taught myself how to properly balance many aspects of myself. Whether you’re willing to admit it or not, we all lost a little bit of ourselves last year. And I know I’m not the only one whose realized it’s time to grow up.

Is Star Trek a lifestyle? Perhaps it is for some. But who are you really if that’s what you live and breathe? How far can you become so wrapped up into a franchise that you no longer who you are? As I grow older, I’m finding that I really want more out of life. I need to do things in the here and now.

I’ve wasted so much time.
Not anymore.

What do I want? I still want to, someday, become a published author. I’m tired of being known for my procrastination. I’m tired of being disappointed in my own laziness when I’ve got only myself to take care of.

So while I feel I can no longer call myself a fan of Star Trek, I can still appreciate it for the joys and lessons it’s brought me over the years (heck I’m currently working on a science fantasy manuscript). Will I still throw on an episode or two in the future for background noise? Most likely. But I will no longer write on anything Trek.

TL;DR – It is perfectly normal and acceptable to be passionate about what you love. My own passions and loves have merely realigned.

3 Comments Add yours

  1. I’m sorry you’re no longer a fan of Star Trek. I don’t like the new movies and shows, I think they’ve lost the Rodenberry vision of a better future, but I still like the originals with Voyager being a favorite.
    However, I’m excited for what your future has in store and I look forward to your posts.
    As Spock would say, live long and prosper.

    1. Thank you! Me too. I realized if I wanted to affirm who I am in my writing, in my faith, in my family, I couldn’t do so while holding on to the past. Because, quite honestly, that’s the past me. I wanted to make more character arcs posts for the other Trek series, but I found, more and more, that I just didn’t have the same connection to the franchise as I used to. And yes, that’s yet another reason – the shows have lost *some, not all, but most of Roddenberry’s vision.

  2. Cassandra Henken says:

    I really resonated with what you said about losing a bit of myself last year and realizing I need to grow up. That’s exactly what I did. I always knew there was a time in my life I would have to stop writing fanfiction. I was steadily losing interest in it and Kpop–and then January 6th, 2021 happened, and I spent almost two straight weeks just watching the news. I don’t know what about that made me hit my threshold, but since, I haven’t written a word of fanfiction, and I don’t know if I ever will again.

    BUT. I have been writing a lot of poetry, blog posts, and I’ve even been getting some work done on my nove. And it feels GOOD. I don’t miss fanfiction; I’m happy to be writing what I’m writing right now.

    I also relate to the second to last paragraph. I do have children, which takes away a lot of time; but not as much time as my own mental health issues and neurodivergency does. I’m tired of those things getting in the way of my creativity, so I’ve been pushing myself to be better. And it’s working!

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